Long Breaks Are Mandatory For Uber Drivers In The UK

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(Bick Bhangoo) #1

(Image source: Pixabay)

The hustle often starts in the wee hours of the morning.

Working non-stop on busy roads, Uber drivers exhaust their physical and mental energy in the process of shuttling riders, safely, to their destinations. It’s an extremely stressful job. Most driver-partners have to work long hours—almost throughout the day—to make enough money that will help them pay the bills, buy groceries, live the life they deserve.

But in doing so, they work for long hours, putting themselves and their passengers at risk. Uber’s new mandatory break is trying to control that.

The new policy

After the installation of the new CEO and cultural norms, Uber has recently put out a new policy.

(Image source: Pixabay)

This time, the policy, taking breaks after long hours of work, is aimed at the company’s driver-partners in the UK. The ride-hailing app has authorized that its drivers in the UK must take at least 6-hours break after working for 10 hours on the road. The main goal of the new law is, as the company stated, to “maximize safety rides.”

The driving job is tedious. Some Uber drivers drive all day, shuttling riders from one end to the other, trying to pick as many passengers as they can, so they could earn more money. However, working behind the wheels for a long time consumes more energy, as the task is exhaustive.

To ensure that drivers transport passengers safely to their destinations, drivers need to rest to do their job well. For now, the new policy is applied just for Uber drivers in the UK, a country that until now, was in a combative relationship with the ride-hailing app under its former founder and CEO, Travis Kalanick.

The new policy is actually good for the safety of drivers as well as for riders. And during that long break, drivers will not be able to take another passenger.

Here’s what I mean:

No ride for now. It’s time for a nap.

Drivers won’t be able to accept rides while on the break.

The new policy is strict; the company wants to make sure that drivers really relax during the resting hours. “While drivers only spend an average of 30 hours a week logged into our app, we want to do our part to ensure they don’t drive tired,” Uber’s UK head of policy Andrew Byrne said. “That’s why we’ve been sending drivers regular reminders to take rest breaks,” he added.

So, how do you maximize this mandatory break?

Well, here’s my suggestion:

Take some nap to clear your head. Because you can’t produce quality work with low levels of energy. So, whether you’re a nanny, a work-from-home mom, or an independent contractor, you need quality sleep to do quality work.

Several studies have shown that quality sleep not only increases our energy, it also improves our physical health.

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(Image source: MankatoClinic)

So as your resting period began, pull over and take a nap. Once you cool off your head, you can get back on the road full of energy to carry out your best rides. The mandatory break policy is actually great for you, your job, and your safety.

Let’s talk more about why Uber decided to enact this new policy.

The rationale behind the mandatory shift policy

If you’re watching the news, you’ll notice that Uber has faced numerous legal and security battles with law enforcement, transport authorities, and government officials around the world.

However, the company wants to put a halt on all its controversies. Uber’s leadership under Mr. Dara Khosrowshahi is trying to operate in a completely new way, based on trust, mutual respect, and mutual understanding.

(Image source: Uber)

The mandatory break is part of that agenda. The company understands that when it improves its security, it solves half of its problems. Some of the rationales behind the mandatory shift are as follows:

  • Reduce exhaustion. By nature, driving is tiresome. If you drive for the period of 10 hours, you’ll surely get tired. The mandatory break wants to make sure that you get some rest.
  • Encourage safety . Working for hours behind the wheels is not easy, especially if you work for a lengthy period. At some point, you’ll get tired, and when you do, your mental energy will be depleted. The break will help you recharge and help you get back on the road to, safely, shuttle your riders to their destinations.
  • Reduce accidents . When you get some rest, you’ll surely drive safely. And safe driving reduces the risk of accidents.

The whole policy makes sense. It’s up to you, as a driver, to make the best out of it.

Conclusion

Uber’s six-hour break policy is a new safety feature for its driver-partners.

It regulates their uncanny attitude to work super hard, risking their life, and that of their riders, on the road. By authorizing a mandatory shift for a lengthy period, drivers will have to comply with the rule. They may choose to go home and sleep for 6-hours or just relax and recharge over a tonic drink at a bar.

Then get back to hustle, back on the road, with a brand new, clear mind.


Uber Conforms to Transport for London (TfL)
(Brandon Bhangoo) #2

Taking a nap is important, but knowing when not to drive is mandatory in my opinion I have found myself nodding off to seep during rides, and drank cold water to wake up BUT, that is not a good solution, neither is caffeine pills. Nothing beats a good rest and if putting yourself or your passengers in danger is an outcome of trying to drive more hours, then your a criminal in my mind. If a driver falls asleep during a ride and causes and accident, even if its minor, he should be banned from driving for Uber…for life!


(Steve Mann) #3

Anyone that drives when tired is an idiot and should have his or her license cancelled.


(Andrew Martin) #4

Hey Steve, not everyone is an idiot, sometimes you find yourself in a situation, such as driving back home late at night, and suddenly you feel tired. It happens to all of us at some time.


(Steve Mann) #5

Andrew, if you are tired and your eyelids are heavy and you are driving along a dark road, you have passengers, and there is an occasional car passing by, what do you do? Continue to drive or pull over for a 10 minute power nap?


(Andrew Martin) #6

Yes Steve, I do that, in fact I had one instance when I was driving my family and nearly fell asleep at the wheel. I realized how dangerous the situation was, and told my wife that whenever I am tired she has an option, either replace me as driver or let me stop to take a nap. Guess which option she chose.