Rasier llc 1099 Earning Different From Actual Earning, Why?


(David Smith) #1

So I get my 1099 and see my tax lady. I see that the total I made for the year was more then I thought. I get disability, and I can not make more than 1k a month. So I was shocked that my 1099 is showing I made more than 1k even 2k a month. I started looking at the app for each week and added the numbers. The different I made per month on the app vs. what the 1099 states I made per month are a different of $250-1200. This is crazy. Uber is reporting to the IRS that I made more then I did. Just an example in Oct 1099 shows I made 2404.72, but on the app, before gas, I made 1728.02. That is a difference of $676.70. WTF Why is uber doing this. For a single mom on disability, this messes me up when getting a refund. Uber has some explaining to do. Please, everyone, look at your 1099 and what the app states there might be a difference.


(Donna Harris) #2

You pay taxes on the 100% you make before uber takes their cut, so you made $100 you got $75 on that day but you have to pay taxes on the $100. Hope it helps


(Mitchel) #3

Look at the breakdown they also provide. It’s the same as an employer does “gross” and “net.” I filed with an uber rasier llc 1099 last year; their fees are considered “referral expense.”


(Peter Dave) #4

The disability benefits eligibility is based on NET income, not on the Gross on the 1099. You may deduct over 50 cents per mile driven to get to that Net Income. Talk to any tax preparer-you will not have any problem with your disability income requirements


(Kimberly Nelson) #5

You are responsible for every penny uber made. Don’t you realize they don’t make any money? Nah just kidding. You can deduct all of what they billed to you and mileage. After deductions, you will likely be fine.


(Harris Frank) #6

Uber’s 1099k shows everything they charged the passenger. From that, you have to deduct their fees, airport fees, tolls and booking fees.


(Anderson Lee) #7

Maybe tips added in? I note every time they put a deposit in my account so I can check it myself. Maybe it is because of my accounting background.


(Audrina Jameson) #8

No, it’s the Uber/Lyft fees. Gross amount is what the rider paid, which is your income. All of the fees paid out to Uber are expenses. So, when the 1099’s are released, they will also release a Yearly Summary to show that breakdown.


(Eric Moore) #9

When did SSDI start looking at people net income? I don’t know why uber is including their income on driver’s 1099k weird… I’m scared now although I made a few dollars. I did keep my receipts to itemized all this stuff, and I don’t have $600 to give to a tax person.


(David Smith) #10

SS has always had a cap on the extra income you can make. The point is if you are healthy enough to earn x amount you don’t need the SS money set aside for people who can’t work.


(Eric Moore) #11

Are you talking to me because I thought they count gross income? I have no idea what prompted this sideways response. I get SSI disability know what it is for and income guidelines. Some people act like SSI di is a welfare check when it fact employee paid to get this benefits its insurance issued by the US govt for temp or perm disabled individuals. Some people who are disabled might be able to restore some of their livelihood by working part-time.


(Jose Hernandez) #12

I haven’t received mine, but since 2013, when I started with uber. Your payout is not what you made because they report on your Rasier llc 1099 the 20 or 25% commission that they charge you. Also, they include other fees, like the one they called safety fee before, now called booking fee.

Since I haven’t received mine, I can not tell precisely what uber will be reporting on my behalf, but all the money that uber keeps, from my “earnings” it is a deduction on your taxes or business expense. However you want to call it, and you should use Schedule C very wisely.

For instance, they will be reimbursing you for road Toll fees; if you incurred any since you had that disbursement, you need to report it as a business expense deduction, so don’t get a tax liability on that reimbursement, and doesn’t count as net income.

Most tax preparers will ill-advised you, when it comes to self-employed income tax, since they are for a quick buck, and will take the easiest and fastest route, or don’t know and don’t want to know about all your tax deductions, they don’t want to sound un-knowledgeable.

I’m not a CPA, nor a Professional tax preparer, and you’ll be better off with a proven professional that can help you navigate thru Schedule C.


(Dennis Scott) #13

There are lots of us in this boat. First SSDI is different than survivors benefits and Social Security benefits. It is strictly based on the inability for gainful employment. A person may still be able to work, but not within the parameters of an employer’s requirements. IE One may have to sit and rest often, or not work sporadically because of flare-ups of pain. I know I am one. Driving for Uber is on your own time and not on a clock. You can drive or not drive, your choice. Would a cab company allow you not to operate or quit driving because you had pain? Sure, see how many times you can do that and keep a job. We aren’t out to screw the system. We worked hard and for some unfortunate reason, we can’t anymore. Uber gives us the opportunity to not just sit around waiting to die. It takes me about an hour in the morning before I can stand up straight. I’m not sure driving for several hours is doing me any good, but at least I can get out there and make a car payment. The question of the poster is how much Uber income will be considered to too much to lose the SSDI benefits and how is it reported to SS Admin and is its net income or gross. If Gross then Uber has a lot of explaining to do when it comes to reporting to IRS what we are paid since we don’t even see that money. It is Uber’s way of keeping IRS off their back. They will never get audited unless every driver in the nation gets audited simultaneously.


(David Smith) #14

I believe that is incorrect. It is my understanding that Uber Technologies does nothing but the development of the app. They then license the technology to Raiser, LLC which is a wholly owned subsidiary of Uber Technologies, thereby making them separate companies for tax purposes.


(John Dorusinec) #15

that is absolutely sick