No insurance for independent contractors

lyftdriver
lyft
uber
uberdriver

(Snyder Reed) #1

Being that drivers are independent contractors does not entitle you to health coverage…Uber’s policy. I work for them and I don’t have health insurance either. I am single without children and the affordable care act was going to charge me $250 a month…and I don’t get paid enough to get any health care percentage taken from my check. More people are in the same boat or worse than many.


(John Paul) #2

Out of all the bull shit perk crap that uber offers its drivers the only one that saves me more money than I could have saved myself was the At&t discount. The rest of the crap coupons they post I can do better by going in and negotiating the price myself or I can google for an online coupon and do better


(Eric Moore) #3

Okay, bringing the proof… I’ve gone through and used Stride, too. The plan prices probably varied because they misquoted your subsidy vs. what the California site quoted.


(Jeremy Mwan) #4

Brokers only make $$ off commissions from the health insurance company after you buy. It’s illegal to charge different rates for the same plan…you would’ve ultimately ended up paying the same wherever you bought. Ehealth has a good FAQ about that if you’re interested.


(Malcom Max) #5

I carry my insurance through the company from which my spouse retired.
(Dental, major medical, vision) = $1,000/mo.


(Hammad Riggs) #6

Being that drivers are independent contractors does not entitle you to health coverage…Uber’s policy. I work for them and I don’t have health insurance either.


(Melinda Foster) #7

I am single without children and the affordable care act was going to charge me $250 a month…and I don’t get paid enough to get any health care percentage taken from my check. More people are in the same boat or worse than many.


(Jose Hernandez) #8

Old enough. My age doesn’t matter since my company doesn’t charge older and younger employees different prices. Before I got that job I had a plan subsidized through the ACA that was affordable - $121.


(Hassan) #9

I still remember the discussion with them years ago. Trying to explain the car service business was like trying to teach my mother how a Japanese Input Method works. ((Yes, I actually did try to explain that to her one time because she wanted to understand something I was working on!!! Her eyes glazed over, she nodded, then told me she needed a nap!!!)


(Audrina Jameson) #10

I don’t drive anymore but I’ve been continuously insured through either my own employer or my wife’s for 20+ years. Every year at open enrollment, we review both out policies and go with whichever one is better.


(Davidson Mark) #11

I’ve been carrying the insurance for the past 4 years but a recent merger has made me suspect that my insurance is going to change for the worse and will probably end up switching back to my wife’s.


(Mitchel) #12

Wow, that’s expensive! I bet you still have sizable out-of-pocket expenses to cover… Do you have any ideas on what you’re going to do starting in October, or will you just continue with the same plan?


(Jack Dolen) #13

The city I retired from allows retirees to retain their medical insurance–and the $207 they kick in for all their employees, so I pay $400 per month for top-of-the-line insurance. No co-pays. Prescriptions $5 per month. Office visits $20. Very happy.